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Decorate Your Entry or Foyer

Welcome Your Guests With a Smile at Your Front Door

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Decorate Your Entry or Foyer

Display an interesting collection of memorabilia in an entryway.

Sometimes the smallest spaces in your home can be the most challenging to decorate. There isn't room for everything you'd like to put there and you don't spend more than a couple of minutes there at any given time.

But these small spaces can help to show off some of your wildest decorating ideas and serve as the welcoming mat to your home. pend a little extra time decorating this space in your home, and you'll love it!

It's tempting to look at your entryway from inside your home. But be a guest for a moment. Walk outside and look in. Does it look as great coming in as it does from the inside?

Here are some great tips for decorating your foyer or entry, a small but important space.

  • As you open your front door from outside, the entry or foyer is the first thing you see. Get rid of anything that is offensive to the eye. Remember to close interior doors so you can't see dirty dishes in the sink or clothes on the ironing board.

  • Your front entry should be your home's welcoming smile and greeting to your family and guests. Use this small area to create a sense of expectancy in your guests and make them want to come in for more. Fresh flowers are a real plus.

  • You may be tempted, but don't practice basic color theory here. Light colors won't make a big space out of one barely big enough to turn around in. Be bold, even wild. Don't be shy. You're only passing through on your way to somewhere else.

  • If you are brave enough to create a really dramatic statement, how about painting the walls navy blue, chocolate brown, Chinese red, or even black?

  • Now mount a collection on the walls of just about anything on it like plates, hats, evening bags, family photos, musical instruments,--whatever you have. Your collection will really stand out and tell your guests immediately what you love. And what a way to prompt an interesting conversation!

  • If you've been drooling over an exquisite, hand-painted wallpaper or luxurious silk fabric, a small foyer would be the perfect place to use it. Because the space is tiny, you'll need less of the paper or fabric than you'd need in a larger room, but you'll smile with pride every time you walk in and out.

  • If you have even a little headroom, a chandelier is a great improvement over a common ceiling fixture. Not something huge and overpowering, but an interesting wrought iron or vintage crystal piece. Be sure the wiring is to code and mount it so even your tallest guest (6’4”) won’t bump into it.

  • Remember to install a dimmer switch for your foyer light fixture. Guests entering at night will be in the mood from the moment they arrive.

  • Every foyer or entryway should have a mirror for last-minute primping. And the bigger the better! A good glass company can install a bevel-edged mirror into any family heirloom frame or garage sale find. Remember to clean up and touch up the molding of the frame before the glass goes in.

  • You may not have much room for furniture in your entry. A small entry way can feel more substantial with a demi-lune or small rectangular table up against a bare wall. It can catch stray keys and mail, hold a floral arrangement, or be the base for the obligatory mirror.

  • If your foyer is really just a narrow hallway, try mounting a narrow (8” deep) table top directly on the wall. Cut the outside edge in a pretty scroll or a boxy straight line. You won’t lose precious floor space, but you will gain a place for keys and mail.

  • If your foyer is at least 9 feet wide, place an interesting table right in the middle of the space. You’ll always know where your keys are (on it). Leave at least 3’ all the way around to offer sufficient traffic space.

  • If you have the wall space, an armoire can hide a myriad of family items out of sight. Install cubby holes to hold mittens, hats, umbrellas, and even boots out of sight. Then the coat closet will be tidier and more welcoming for your guests.

  • If you have a set of beautiful wooden hangers in the closet, your guests will feel as though you really want their coats to stay there. And they’ll keep your own coats that live there in better shape and help them last longer.

  • Try mounting antiqued iron or brass finials on the wall to catch thrown jackets, hats, or scarves. They hold things well and look artsy when bare.

Spend a little time in this little space and make it a showcase. You'll smile every time you enter your personal castle.

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